Essay peace earth

At the beginning of this new millennium I was asked to discuss, here in Oslo, the greatest challenge that the world faces. Among all the possible choices, I decided that the most serious and universal problem is the growing chasm between the richest and poorest people on earth. Citizens of the ten wealthiest countries are now seventy-five times richer than those who live in the ten poorest ones, and the separation is increasing every year, not only between nations but also within them. The results of this disparity are root causes of most of the world's unresolved problems, including starvation, illiteracy, environmental degradation, violent conflict, and unnecessary illnesses that range from Guinea worm to HIV/AIDS.

  • Donald A. Grinde --
    Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Buffalo, Don gave permission to reproduce Exemplar of Liberty in its entirety here for which we are extremely grateful.
  • John Kahionhes Fadden --
    John has generously made some of his artwork available, documentation on the Six Nations and given permission to include all the drawings he created for Exemplar of Liberty . We are also indebted to John for allowing us to reproduce other images he provided us copies with that are included on this page. John can be reached at:
                  Six Nations Indian Museum
                  HCR 1, Box 10
                  Onchiota, NY   12989
                  518/891-2299






    1. Regarding the origination of the word Iroquois , Another matter that surprised many contemporary observers was the Iroquois' sophisticated use of oratory. Their excellence with the spoken word, among other attributes, often caused Colden and others to compare the Iroquois to the Romans and Greeks. The French use of the term Iroquois to describe the confederacy was itself related to this oral tradition; it came from the practice of ending their orations with the two words hiro and kone . The first meant "I say" or "I have said" and the second was an exclamation of joy or sorrow according to the circumstances of the speech. The two words, joined and made subject to French pronunciation, became Iroquois. The English were often exposed to the Iroquois' oratorical skills at eighteenth-century treaty councils.

      Essay peace earth

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