Essay topics for forensic science

  • Neurolinguistic programming – how much truth is there in it?
  • Stratificational analysis of the English pronunciation.
  • Cockney – history, development, features.
  • Speech portrait of a person.
  • Laissez-faire capitalism vs. big government.
  • Nash equilibrium as the main principle of the game theory.
  • Game theory in political science.
  • The study of human-animal interaction throughout the history of mankind.
  • Modern heterodox economic theories (feminist economics, green economics).
  • History and development of the Austrian School of Economics.
  • Gestalt-psychology, its development, major ideologists and application.
  • Forensic psychology – cooperation between psychological science and law enforcement systems.
  • Philosophy of language – the history of term and its meaning.
  • Nanny states and the reason of their appearance.
  • Sherman Antitrust Act as the beginning of the end for the laissez-faire capitalism in America.
  • Ayn Rand as the prophet of the world economic crisis.
  • Neuromarketing – the meaning behind the term.
  • The interdependence of national spirit to geographical position.
  • Usage of music in treatment of mental disorders.
  • Philosophy of science.
  • Social sciences let us study the most interesting part there is to study: ourselves, and let us understand how little we know and how much there is still to be known. Don’t hesitate to avail of the topics presented above or invent your own ones along the same lines.

    Your Dissertation  is the final part of the course. You will undertake a 15,000-word research project that combines a review of previous research undertaken in your chosen topic with your own data collection and analysis. This provides a unique opportunity for you to demonstrate the subject knowledge you have acquired, as well as your analytical abilities and problem-solving skills which are highly regarded by potential employers. During this phase, your research will be supervised by an experienced academic with expertise in your chosen topic area.

    Some of our graduates pursue a career in psychology by undertaking postgraduate training to become professional psychologists, including our BPS-accredited master’s programmes. However, UCLan graduates are valued more broadly, and others utilise the skills that our degree encourages to take graduate-level positions in a range of organisations, including the Police, Prison Service, NHS, social and community services, health authorities and in the pharmaceutical industry, and in education and training. A large number of the graduates from this course go on to study the MSc Forensic Psychology course taking advantage of the range of scholarships and discounts available to our own students. Others have worked within the health services (for example, assistant psychologist, carer, support worker), within legal services (for example, HMPS, litigation clerk, law mentor) or used their psychology skills in other domains such as management, sales and account manager.

    This module introduces students to the study of terrorism and political violence, and engages with the primary debates in the field. The first half of the module addresses definitional, epistemological and methodological issues raised by the study of political violence. The module will also outline the history of modern political violence and the evolution of the way it has been defined and studied. In this context, the module will explore the nature and evolution of various forms of contemporary political violence, including: wars; ‘new wars'; insurgency and counterinsurgency; irregular warfare; guerrilla warfare; state and non-state terrorism; and counter-terrorism. Throughout, focus will be given to a range of mainstream and critical approaches to the field, ensuring that students become aware of the rich variety of perspectives which can be adopted in relation to the subject. In the second half of the module, time will be given to examining a range of human rights issues and debates which arise in relation to political violence and terrorism.

    Essay topics for forensic science

    essay topics for forensic science

    This module introduces students to the study of terrorism and political violence, and engages with the primary debates in the field. The first half of the module addresses definitional, epistemological and methodological issues raised by the study of political violence. The module will also outline the history of modern political violence and the evolution of the way it has been defined and studied. In this context, the module will explore the nature and evolution of various forms of contemporary political violence, including: wars; ‘new wars'; insurgency and counterinsurgency; irregular warfare; guerrilla warfare; state and non-state terrorism; and counter-terrorism. Throughout, focus will be given to a range of mainstream and critical approaches to the field, ensuring that students become aware of the rich variety of perspectives which can be adopted in relation to the subject. In the second half of the module, time will be given to examining a range of human rights issues and debates which arise in relation to political violence and terrorism.

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