Essay walt whitman poems

Much energy has been invested in trying to identify a concrete, flesh-and-blood male lover whom Dickinson is supposed to have renounced, and to the loss of whom can be traced the secret of her seclusion and the vein of much of her poetry. But the real question, given that the art of poetry is an art of transformation, is how this woman’s mind and imagination may have used the masculine element in the world at large, or those elements personified as masculine—including the men she knew; how her relationship to this reveals itself in her images and language. In a patriarchal culture, specifically the Judeo-Christian, quasi-Puritan culture of 19 th -century New England in which Dickinson grew up, still inflamed with religious revivals, and where the sermon was still an active, if perishing, literary form, the equation of divinity with maleness was so fundamental that it is hardly surprising to find Dickinson, like many an early mystic, blurring erotic with religious experience and imagery. The poem I just read has intimations both of seduction and rape merged with the intense force of a religious experience. But are these metaphors for each other, or for something more intrinsic to Dickinson? Here is another:

Of all the Causes which conspire to blind

Man's erring Judgment, and misguide the Mind,

What the weak Head with strongest Byass rules,

Is Pride, the never-failing Vice of Fools.

Whatever Nature has in Worth deny'd,

She gives in large Recruits of needful Pride;

For as in Bodies, thus in Souls, we find

What wants in Blood and Spirits, swell'd with Wind;

Pride, where Wit fails, steps in to our Defence,

And fills up all the mighty Void of Sense!

If once right Reason drives that Cloud away,

Truth breaks upon us with resistless Day;

Trust not your self; but your Defects to know,

Make use of ev'ry Friend--and ev'ry Foe.

Linda Alexander of San Pedro also thinks of home when she thinks of travel. She chose the poem "Vagabond's House" by Don Blanding, explaining that it "speaks of the house its subject will build and fill with cherished items from travels." "When I have a house … as I sometime may," wrote Blanding, who, in the 1920s and '30s, was sometimes thought of as Hawaii's unofficial poet laureate, "I'll suit my fancy in every way. / I'll fill it with things that have caught my eye / In drifting from Iceland to Molokai…"

Besides the ever-moving tide, Whitman uses light and darkness to symbolize the multiple facets of the human identity. He describes his evil thoughts as his inner darkness, hidden from public view just as the night casts a blanket over the river during his evening commute. He also uses the theater as a metaphor to represent the difference between public life and private life. He acknowledges that he has a sinful streak - but in society, everyone plays a role. The speaker's tone in the poem is honest but also grateful. By appreciating the small things in his life, he feels like a part of something bigger.

Essay walt whitman poems

essay walt whitman poems

Besides the ever-moving tide, Whitman uses light and darkness to symbolize the multiple facets of the human identity. He describes his evil thoughts as his inner darkness, hidden from public view just as the night casts a blanket over the river during his evening commute. He also uses the theater as a metaphor to represent the difference between public life and private life. He acknowledges that he has a sinful streak - but in society, everyone plays a role. The speaker's tone in the poem is honest but also grateful. By appreciating the small things in his life, he feels like a part of something bigger.

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