Literary interpretation essay

If we substitute for a frog a "Mr. Goodwill" or a "Mr. Prudence," and for the scorpion "Mr. Treachery" or "Mr. Two-Face," and make the river any river and substitute for "We're both Arabs . . ." "We're both men . ." we turn the fable [which illustrates human tendencies by using animals as illustrative examples] into an allegory [a narrative in which each character and action has symbolic meaning]. On the other hand, if we turn the frog into a father and the scorpion into a son (boatman and passenger) and we have the son say "We're both sons of God, aren't we?", then we have a parable (if a rather cynical one) about the wickedness of human nature and the sin of parricide. (22)

What is the definition of the hapax legomenon? In Greek, hapax legomenon means "something said only once" and refers to any word that appears in a text or work of literature only one time. A hapax legomenon is usually a nonce word, or a word created by the author on an occasion when no other word can communicate the proper meaning given the context. Hapax legomena are not so significant or common in modern, easily translatable literature, but are very important in relation to the Bible and other old, historical texts needing to be translated into foreign languages.

Literary interpretation essay

literary interpretation essay

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